cancer prevention
and control

COLLOQUIUM

The Leptin Signaling Cascade and Pediatric Obesity

Jack A. Yanovski, M.D., Ph.D.

Chief, Section on Growth and Obesity,
PDEGEN Eunice Kennedy Shriver
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Hatfield Clinical Research Center
National Institutes of Health

Wednesday, February 15, 2012
11:00am
6130 Executive Boulevard, Rockville MD
EPN Conference Room G

Jack Yanovski is Chief of the Section on Growth and Obesity, in the Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, one of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He obtained his medical degree in 1986 at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was also awarded a PhD in Physiological Psychology in 1989. After completing his residency in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and fellowship training in Pediatric Endocrinology at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Yanovski became a senior fellow at the National Institutes of Health. In response to the growing problem of pediatric obesity, Dr. Yanovski founded the NIH’s Unit on Growth and Obesity in 1997. Dr. Yanovski has carried out a series of clinical studies related to the evaluation and treatment of overweight and obesity in children and adults, as well as laboratory investigations of the molecular etiologies of obesity. Dr. Yanovski has authored or co-authored over 200 published manuscripts and has served as a standing member of the NSCF, NIH Study Section, and as Chair of The Obesity Society’s annual Scientific Meeting. Among other awards, he has received the Public Health Service’s Outstanding Service Medal for innovative studies on obesity.

If you are a person with a disability and require any assistive device, services or other reasonable accommodation to participate in this activity, please contact the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at 301-496-8640 at least one week in advance of the lecture date to discuss your accommodation needs.